Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2)  
Genetic diversity of Calpain 1 gene in Creole, Nellore and  
Brahman bovine breeds in Bolivia  
1
Agustin H. Falomir­Lockhart2  
Pedro Rojas  
Guillermo Giovambattista2  
Juan A. C. Pereira  
Ariel J. Loza  
Monica H. Carino2  
Rodrigo Hoyos  
Egle E. Villegas­Castagnasso2  
Andres Rogberg­Muñoz2  
1Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Departamento de Santa Cruz, Bolivia.  
2
IGEVET ® Instituto de Genética Veterianaria "Ing. Fernando N. Dulout (UNLP­ CONICET La Plata), Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias,  
Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Av. 60 y 118 ­ La Plata (1900), Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
Abstract. In Bolivia, beef production is mainly based on two genotypes, Bos taurus (Creole cattle) and B. indicus  
(
zebu), being weight gain the main selection criteria used by farmers. However, meat quality and especially  
tenderness must be incorporated in the selection process. Meat tenderness is partly determined by the calpain  
CAPN1)/ calpastatin (CAST) protein system. Thus, the objective of the present work was to determine and  
(
compare the genetic variability of the CAPN1 gene in Creole (CreBo), Brahman (BraBo) and Nellore (NelBo) breeds  
in Bolivia. DNA was extracted from blood samples from 147 CreBo, 59 BraBo and 93 NelBo, and three  
polymorphisms were genotyped using ARMS­PCR (CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751) and PCR­RFLP (CAPN1­530).  
Furthermore, CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751 SNPs were analyzed with Axiom™ Bos 1 Genotyping Array r3 and the  
Axiom™ ArBos 1 Genotyping Array. Allele frequencies associated with higher tenderness in CreBo, BraBo and  
NelBo were 0.22, 0 and 0.09 (CAPN1­316 C; P < 0.001), 0.76, 0.16 and 0.08 (CAPN1­4751 C; P < 0.001), and 0.77, 0.92  
and 0.94 (CAPN1­530 G; P < 0.001). Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed the presence of two LD blocks.  
Our results evidence that CreBo has a higher frequency of alleles associated with higher meat tenderness than the  
cebuine breeds. These markers could be used in breeding programs to improve Bolivian cattle herd meat quality  
either by selection within Creole breeds or crosses with cebuine cattle.  
Keywords: Bolivian Creole, Brahman, Nellore, tenderness, CAPN1, SNPs.  
Diversidad genética del gen Calpaina 1 en las razas bovinas Criollo, Nellore  
y Brahman en Bolivia  
Resumen. En Bolivia, la producción de carne se basa principalmente en la cría de dos genotipos, Bos taurus (ganado  
Criollo) y B. indicus (cebú), siendo la ganancia de peso el principal criterio de selección utilizado por los criadores.  
Sin embargo, la calidad y especialmente la terneza de la carne deben ser incorporadas al proceso de selección. La  
terneza en parte está determinada por el sistema proteico calpaína (CAPN1)/ calpastatina (CAST). Por lo tanto, el  
objetivo del presente trabajo fue determinar y comparar la variabilidad genética del gen CAPN1 en las razas Criolla  
(
CreBo), Brahman (BraBo) y Nelore (NelBo) de Bolivia. El ADN se extrajo de muestras de sangre de 147 CreBo, 59  
BraBo y 93 NelBo, y tres polimorfismos se genotipificaron por ARMS­PCR (CAPN1­316 y CAPN1­4751) y PCR­  
RFLP (CAPN1­530). Adicionalmente, los SNPs CAPN1­316 y CAPN1­4751 fueron analizados con los microarrays  
Axiom™ Bos 1 Genotyping Array r3 y the Axiom™ ArBos 1 Genotyping Array. Las frecuencias de los alelos  
asociados con una mayor terneza en CreBo, BraBo y NelBo fueron 0.22, 0 y 0.09 (CAPN1­316 C; P < 0.001), 0.76, 0.16  
y 0.08 (CAPN1­4751 C; P < 0.001), y 0.77, 0.92 y 0.94 (CAPN1­530 G; P < 0.001). El análisis del desequilibrio de  
ligamiento reveló la presencia de dos bloques. Estos resultados muestran que CreBo presenta una mayor frecuencia  
de alelos asociados a mayor terneza en la carne que las razas cebuinas analizadas. Estos marcadores podrían ser  
utilizados en los programas de cría para mejorar la calidad de la carne del ganado boliviano, tanto por selección  
dentro del ganado Criollo como por cruzamiento con ganado cebú.  
Palabras clave: Criollo Boliviano, Brahman, Nelore, terneza, calpaína, SNPs.  
1
Recibido: 2021­09­03. Aceptado: 2021­12­12  
Autores para la correspondencia: antonios8@hotmail.com ; ggiovam@fcv.unlp.edu.ar  
IGEVET – Instituto de Genética Veterinaria “Ing. Fernando N. Dulout” (UNLP­CONICET LA PLATA), Facultad de Ciencias  
Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Avenida 60 y 118 ­ La Plata (1900), Buenos Aires, Argentina.  
2
1
2
1
21  
1
22  
Pereira et al.  
Abbreviations  
Ang, Angus; ARMS­PCR, amplification­refractory mutation system­polymerase chain reaction; BraAr, Argentinean  
Brahman; BraBo, Bolivian Brahman; Brf, Braford; Brn, Brangus; CAPN1, calpain; CAST, calpastatin; CreAr,  
Argentinean Creole; CreBo, Bolivian Creole; CreCh, Chaqueño Creole; CreSa, Saveedreño Creole; CreVa, Valley  
Creole; CreYa, Yacumeño Creole; Hol, Holstein; LD, linkage disequilibrium; NelBo, Bolivian Nellore; PCR­RFLP,  
polymerase chain reaction­Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism.  
Introducción  
First bovines were introduced to the Americas in the  
5th century by the Spanish conquerors, which landed  
in the Caribbean Islands and then passed to South  
America through Santa Marta (Colombia) (Primo,  
Creole breeds are taurine bovines characterized by  
high longevity and fertility in tropical and subtropical  
environments, as well as increased resistance to  
endemic diseases (Guglielmone et al., 1991; Hansen,  
1994). This contrasts with the majority of European  
taurine breeds, which show less adaptation to such  
environmental conditions (Bouzat et al., 1998). For this  
reason, Creole breeds are considered a valuable  
1
1
992). In less than 50 years, cattle were introduced to  
Venezuela and Peru, which were the main centers of  
dispersion. From Peru, bovines were transported to  
Bolivia, Paraguay and Chile, finally reaching  
Argentina and Uruguay. By the year 1524, the  
presence of cattle in all South American countries was  
reported. Expansion throughout the continent and  
adaptation to different nature conditions allowed a  
great phenotypic variability and the creation of the so­  
called “Creole” breeds (Primo, 1992).  
American genetic resource. In addition, from  
a
productive point of view, Creole cattle have good  
carcass performance (Garriz et al., 1993; Holgado et al.,  
2021).  
The international trend is that consu m ers are  
w illing to p ay m ore for higher qu ality p rod u cts  
(Shackelford et al., 2001), thu s lead ing to an  
im p rovement in selection processes to determine the  
animals with the highest genetic merit towards quality  
(Dekkers and Hospital, 2002). This selection approach  
is most effectively performed for highly heritable traits  
that are easily measured before the reproductive age.  
In this sense, marker­assisted selection has the  
potential to significantly increase the rate of genetic  
improvement of traits of interest (MacNeil and Grosz,  
2002). Tenderness is one of the most important  
qualities in the meat industry, and presents great  
differences between taurine and zebuine breeds.  
Several studies have shown that meat tenderness  
decreases as the percentage of inherited Zebu genes  
increases (Mazzucco et al., 2010).  
Since 19th century, the introduction of highly  
selected commercial European (Shorthorn, Hereford,  
Aberdeen Angus) and Zebu (Nellore, Gir, Guzerat)  
breeds led to a drastic reduction of the Creole cattle  
populations, which were relegated to marginal  
regions. Over time, Creole cattle lost value against the  
introduced breeds, and the Creole pure breed mainly  
remained where commercial breeds were not  
productive. In this context, cattle breeding in Bolivia  
was not an exception (de Alba, 2011). Nowadays, beef  
cattle industry in Bolivia is mainly located in the  
departments of Beni and Santa Cruz, where 80 % of  
the eight million Bolivian cattle are bred. Although the  
department of Beni has a greater number of heads, the  
department of Santa Cruz concentrates the main  
breeders (genetics). Most abundant beef breed is  
Nellore, followed by Brahman and Creole. These Zebu  
breeds were introduced in the mid­20th century and  
adapted to their new environment in an almost  
natural way, and in few years replaced Creole cattle  
from the humid tropical region of Bolivia (Beni and  
north of Santa Cruz). However, there is still a  
considerable number of Creole cattle in Santa Cruz,  
especially in the area called Chaco, characterized by its  
dry seasons and silvopastoral systems. Therefore, Bos  
indicus and B.taurus breeds coexist in two different  
ecosystems, and both should be addressed in the  
improvement of Bolivian selection systems.  
Proteolytic system calpain/ calpastatin consists of  
two proteases (calpains CAPN1 and CAPN2) and an  
inhibitor of calpastatin (CAST). It has an important  
effect on tenderness since it is responsible for initiating  
post mortem degradation of myofibrillar proteins  
(Goll et al., 1992; Huff­Lonergan et al., 1996;  
Koohmaraie, 1992; Ouali and Talmant, 1990). Given  
their biological function, variations in the sequence of  
the genes encoding these enzymes affect their activity  
and, consequently, tenderness (Ng and Henikoff,  
2006). Different studies have analyzed the effect of  
single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on meat  
tenderness (Barendse et al., 2008; Chung et al., 2014;  
Corva et al., 2007; Curi et al., 2010; Gill et al., 2009;  
Juszczuk­Kubiak et al., 2004; López­Rojas et al, 2017;  
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132  
Genetic diversity of Calpain 1 gene in bovine breeds in Bolivia  
123  
Page et al., 2002; Page et al., 2004; Soria et al., 2010;  
White et al., 2005). These studies have reported  
significant associations between different SNPs (e.g.,  
CAPN1­316, CAPN1­530 and CAPN1­4751, CAST­285)  
of the CAPN1, CAPN2 and CAST genes and  
tenderness in different taurine, zebuine and composite  
breeds. In addition, some of these SNPs have been  
associated with other meat quality variables, such as  
color measurement (Castro et al., 2016; Mazzucco et al.,  
2009). Recently, Cui et al. (2016) reported the  
association between CAPN1 promoter polymorphism  
and semen quality in Chinese cattle.  
Although these SNPs have been extensively studied,  
so far there are no reports of Bolivian populations. Thus,  
the objectives of the present work were to determine and  
compare genetic variability of CAPN1­316, CAPN1­4751  
and CAPN1­530 polymorphisms of the CAPN1 gene  
in Creole, Brahman and Nellore breeds in Department  
of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Futrthermore, the data obtained  
were compared with the results obtained in cattle  
breeds bred in the region.  
2
010) and overall acceptability (Avilés et al., 2015).  
Therefore, these genes are currently used as genetic  
markers for this and other variables associated with  
meat quality, such as weight of the hindquarter and  
first calf birth weight (Castro et al., 2016; Gill et al.,  
Material and Methods  
Animal samples  
set of blood samples comprising by unrelated adult  
cattle from Argentinean Creole (CreAr, N = 192),  
Saveedreño (CreSa, N = 39), Angus (Ang, N = 94) and  
Holstein (Hol, N = 88), composite Brangus (Brn, N =  
99), Braford (Brf, N = 46), and Argentinean Brahman  
(BraAr, N = 45) were included in the study to  
genotyping by microarrays. All the animals sampled  
correspond to adult bovines in order to avoid  
including closely related animals. In cases where  
pedigree records were available, this information was  
used during sampling.  
A first set of blood samples from 114 purebred  
Bolivian Creole (CreBo), 59 Bolivian Brahman (BraBo)  
and 93 Bolivian Nellore (NelBo) animals from herds  
located in the Departments of Santa Cruz, Bolivia,  
were taken. Bolivian Creole cattle correspond to four  
local populations, namely, Yacumeño (CreYa, N = 86),  
Saveedreño (CreSa, N = 20), and Chaqueño (CreCh, N  
=
8) were obtained to genotyping by ARMS­PCR and  
PCR­RFLP methods (Table 1). Furthermore, a second  
Table 1. Detailed information on the sampled populations.  
Breed  
Acronym  
CreYa  
N
861  
Sampling site  
Yacumeño Creole  
Saveedreño Creole  
Yabaré, departamento de Santa Cruz, Bolivia  
CreSa  
201; 392  
Saavedra, Provincia Obispo Santisteban, departamento de Santa  
Cruz, Bolivia  
Chaqueño Creole  
CreCh  
81  
Muyupampa, municipio Vaca Gusman, Provincia Luis Calvo, de­  
partamento de Chuquisaca  
1
2
N = number of animals; Genotyped by PCR­RFLP and ARMS­PCR method; and Genotyped using microarrays de SNPs.  
2
.2 DNA extraction and genotyping  
The amplification products were electrophoresed  
in 6 % polyacrylamide gels with TBE 1X. Amplicons  
obtained from CAPN1­530 were digested with  
restriction enzyme PsyI (Fermentas, Hanover, MD,  
USA) overnight at 37 °C and electrophoresed in 6 %  
polyacrylamide gels with TBE 1X. Additionally,  
CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751 SNPs were also  
genotyped in a GeneTitan™ platform (Affymetrix, CA,  
USA) using the Axiom™ Bos 1 Genotyping Array r3  
DNA was extracted from blood samples using the  
commercial Wizard® Genomic Purification kit  
Promega, Madison, WI, USA) according to the  
manufacturer´s specifications. CAPN1­316  
rs17872000) (Page et al., 2002) and CAPN1­4751  
rs17872050) SNPs were genotyped with the ARMS­  
(
(
(
PCR method (Rincon and Medrano, 2003), whereas the  
PCR­RFLP technique (Rincon and Medrano, 2006) was  
used for CAPN1­530 (rs17871051) genotyping (Page et  
al., 2002). All PCR reactions were performed in a final  
volume of 25 µl with the primers described in Rincon  
and Medrano (2003) (Table 2). In the case of CAPN1­  
(
Affymetrix), containing 648 855 SNPs, and the  
Axiom™ ArBos 1 Genotyping Array (Affymetrix),  
which contains 58 936 SNPs. Raw data were processed  
using the Axiom™ Analysis Suite software  
(
%
Affymetrix) and SNPs were filtered by sample (≥ 97  
) and SNP (≥ 97 %) call rates, and exported in .PED  
3
1
16 and CAPN1­4751, the reaction mixture contained  
0 and 1 pmol of each internal and external primer,  
and .MAP format. None animals were excluded.  
respectively.  
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132  
1
24  
Pereira et al.  
2
007) for further gene and haplotype analyses. Five  
samples were genotyped with both assays, obtaining  
more than 95 % concordant results.  
Statistical analysis  
Allelic and genotypic frequencies were calculated  
for each breed using the MS­Tools 3.1 software (Kavan  
and Man, 2011). Expected (he) and observed (ho)  
heterozygosities, Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium (HWE,  
measured through F parameter), population structure  
IS  
(
(
(
estimated by FST index) and linkage disequilibrium  
LD) were determined with GENEPOP 4.0 software  
Rousset, 2007). Haplotypes for each breed were  
reconstructed using Gabriel algorithm and visualized  
with Haploview 4.1 (Barrett et al., 2005) software.  
Resultados  
Results of CAPN1­316, CAPN1­4751 and CAPN1­  
5
30 SNPs genotyping with ARMS­PCR and PCR­RFLP  
are presented in Table 3. They show the estimated  
allele and genotype frequencies of the analyzed SNPs  
in CreBo, NelBo and BraBo populations. In CreBo,  
CAPN1­316­G, CAPN1­4751­C and CAPN1­530­G  
were the most frequent alleles, while in the zebu  
breeds (NelBo and BraBo) the most frequent alleles  
were CAPN1­316­G, CAPN1­4751­T and CAPN1­530­  
G. In the case of CAPN1­316, the G allele was fixed in  
BraBo, resulting in he values between 0.37 for CAPN1­  
4
751 in CreBo and 0.12 for CAPN1­530 in NelBo  
(
Table 4). HWE showed that three of the eight  
performed tests were in disequilibrium (CAPN1­316  
and CAPN1­530 in NelBo, and CAPN1­4751 in BraBo),  
in all cases due to a significant increase of homozygote  
genotypes (Table 4). The fact that NelBo and BraBo  
samples belonged to different farms would suggest  
that this ho reduction could be caused by  
subpopulation structure (Wahlund effect) and/ or  
inbreeding. The analysis of population structure  
evidenced that inter­population variance accounted  
for 9.36 % of the total variance for the CAPN1 gene (p­  
value  
comparisons resulted statistically significant (p­values  
0.05), with the exception of BraBo­NelBo for  
CAPN1­4751 (p­values = 0.192) and CreBo­BraBo for  
CAPN1­530 (p­values 0.401). FST  
values varied between 0 in NelBo­BraBo for CAPN1­  
<
0.01). Furthermore, four out of nine  
<
=
SNP annotation was performed using the  
Axiom_GW_Bos_SNP_1.na35.annot  
Axiom_ArBos_1.1.na35.annot annotation  
and  
files  
5
5
30 and 0.59 in NelBo­CreBo for CAPN1­4751 (Table  
).  
(
Affymetrix) and positions were assigned according to  
the bovine genome assembly UMD 3.1. Eleven SNPs  
located within CAPN1 genes (from BTA29:44.06 to  
After filtering CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751  
genotypes from the used microarrays data, that  
include information from two Creole cattle  
populations (CreSa and CreAr), two Taurine  
4
4.09 Mb, including CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751)  
were filtered using PLINK 1.9 software (Purcell et al.,  
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132  
Genetic diversity of Calpain 1 gene in bovine breeds in Bolivia  
125  
European breeds (Ang and Hol), two composite  
breeds (Brn and Brf) and one zebuine (BraAr), allele  
and genotype frequencies were further estimated  
frequency, while Hol showed the lowest frequency of  
this allele. Regarding CAPN1­316 SNPs, Ang had  
similar allele frequencies than CreAr cattle, while the  
CreSa and Hol exhibited lower frequencies of C  
variant. Composite breeds (Brn and Brf) had higher  
frequencies of CAPN1­316­G and CAPN1­4751­T than  
Creole cattle due to the Zebu influence (Table 6). These  
allele frequencies resulted in he values between 0.47  
for CAPN1­316 in CreAr and 0.09 for CAPN1­316 and  
CAPN1­4751in BraAr (Table 7), while all analyzed  
populations were in HWE (Table 7).  
(
Table 6). Our results showed that CAPN1­316­G and  
CAPN1­4751­C were the most abundant alleles in  
analyzed Creole cattle populations, while CAPN1­316­  
G and CAPN1­4751­T were the most frequent alleles in  
BraAr. In contrast to BraBo, the frequency of CAPN1­  
3
16­C allele in BraAr was 0.04. Compared to Creole  
cattle, the British breed Ang, characterized by its  
tender meat, presented higher CAPN1­4751­T  
Table 3. Gene and genotypic frequencies estimated for CAPN1­316, CAPN1­4751 and CAPN1­530SNPs in the Bolivian populations of Creole  
(
CreBo), Nellore (NelBo) and Brahman (BraBo) breeds. Number of animals between brackets.  
CAPN1­316  
Breed  
Genotype  
CC  
Allele Frequency  
CG  
GG  
C
G
0.78  
0.91  
1
CreBo  
NelBo  
BraBo  
0.037 (4)  
0.092 (8)  
0 (0)  
0.374 (40)  
0.023 (2)  
0 (0)  
0.589 (63)  
0.885 (98)  
1 (51)  
0.22  
0.09  
0
CAPN1­4751  
Genotype  
CC  
Breed  
Allele Frequency  
TT  
TC  
C
T
CreBo  
NelBo  
BraBo  
0.558 (63)  
0.022 (2)  
0.154 (8)  
CAPN1­530  
Genotype  
AA  
0.398 (45)  
0.167 (15)  
0.019 (1)  
0.044 (5)  
0.811 (92)  
0.827 (43)  
0.76  
0.08  
0.16  
0.24  
0.92  
0.84  
Breed  
Allele Frequency  
GG  
AG  
A
G
CreBo  
NelBo  
BraBo  
0.075 (8)  
0.057 (5)  
0.109 (6)  
0.327 (35)  
0.057 (5)  
0.164 (9)  
0.598 (64)  
0.886 (99)  
0.727 (40)  
0.23  
0.06  
0.08  
0.77  
0.94  
0.92  
Table 4. Number of detected alleles (na), observed (ho) and expected (he) heterozygosities, and Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, measured  
through FIS index) for CAPN1­316, CAPN1­4751 and CAPN1­530 SNPs in the Bolivian Creole (CreBo), Bolivian Nellore (NelBo) and Bolivian  
Brahman (BraBo). ND: not determined.  
CAPN1­316  
Population  
na  
2
2
ho  
he  
F (p value)  
IS  
Creole (CreBo)  
Nellore (NelBo)  
Brahman (BraBo)  
0.37  
0.02  
0
0.35  
0.17  
0
­0.070 (0.58)  
0.890 (< 0.001)  
ND  
1
CAPN1­4751  
Population  
na  
2
2
ho  
he  
F (p value)  
­0.077 (0.61)  
0.175 (0.12)  
IS  
Creole (CreBo)  
Nellore (NelBo)  
Brahman (BraBo)  
0.40  
0.12  
0.02  
0.37  
0.14  
0.28  
2
0.931 (< 0.001)  
CAPN1­530  
Population  
na  
2
2
ho  
he  
F (p value)  
IS  
Creole (CreBo)  
Nellore (NelBo)  
Brahman (BraBo)  
0.32  
0.07  
0.16  
0.36  
0.12  
0.15  
0.117 (0,28)  
0.393 (0.004)  
­0.080 (1.00)  
2
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132  
1
26  
Pereira et al.  
Table 5. Population structure, measured through pairwise FST  
parameter, of CAPN1­316, CAPN1­4751 and CAPN1­530 SNPs in  
Bolivian Creole (CreBo), Bolivian Nellore (NelBo) and Brahman  
Table 6. Allele frequencies of CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751  
genotyped using Bos 1 microarray (Affymetrix) and the Axiom™  
ArBos 1 Genotyping Array (Affymetrix) in Creole Saavedreño  
(CreSa), Argentinean Creole (CreAr), Angus (Ang), Holstein (Hol),  
Brangus (Brn), Bradford (Brf), and Argentinean Brahman (BraAr).  
(
BraBo). FST and p­values are shown above and below the diagonal,  
respectively.  
CAPN1­316  
CreBo  
Population  
CAPN1­316  
CAPN1­4751  
NelBo  
0.058  
0
BraBo  
0.170  
0.057  
0
C
G
C
T
CreBo  
NelBo  
0
CreSa  
CreAr  
Ang  
Hol  
11.54  
36.98  
33.87  
27.27  
22.99  
17.39  
4.44  
88.46  
63.02  
66.13  
72.73  
77.01  
82.61  
95.56  
78.95  
80.79  
62.23  
89.20  
49.85  
34.78  
4.44  
21.05  
19.21  
37.77  
10.80  
50.15  
65.22  
95.56  
0.002  
BraBo < 0.0001  
0.0003  
CAPN1­4751  
CreBo  
NelBo  
0.639  
0
BraBo  
0.506  
0.027  
0
Brn  
CreBo  
0
NelBo < 0.0001  
BraBo < 0.0001  
Brf  
0.192  
BraAr  
CAPN1­530  
CreBo  
NelBo  
0.102  
0
BraBo  
0.067  
­ 0.006  
0
CreBo  
NelBo < 0.0001  
BraBo 0.401  
0
0.016  
Table 7. a. Number of detected alleles (na), observed (ho) and expected (he) heterozygosities, and Hardy­Weinberg equilibrium (HWE measured  
through FIS index) for CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751 genotyped using Allele frequencies of CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­4751 genotyped using Bos 1  
microarray (Affymetrix) and the Axiom™ ArBos 1 Genotyping Array (Affymetrix) in Creole Saavedreño (CreSa), Argentinean Creole (CreAr),  
Angus (Ang), Holstein (Hol), Brangus (Brn), Bradford (Brf), and Argentinean Brahman (BraAr). b. P values of the genetic differentiation for each  
studied population pair estimated using exact G test for CAPN1­316 (Above) and CAPN1­4751 (Below).  
a.  
CAPN1­316  
CAPN1­4751  
Population  
N
F (p value)  
F (p value)  
IS  
IS  
ho  
he  
ho  
he  
CreSa  
CreAr  
Ang  
Hol  
Brn  
Brf  
39  
192  
94  
88  
99  
0.18  
0.46  
0.38  
0.39  
0.35  
0.26  
0.09  
0.21  
0.47  
0.45  
0.40  
0.35  
0.29  
0.09  
0.134 (0.405)  
0.019 (0.877)  
0.165 (0.162)  
0.032 (0.791)  
­ 0.035 (1.000)  
0.103 (0.601)  
0.007 (0.878)  
0.32  
0.29  
0.39  
0.19  
0.53  
0.52  
0.09  
0.34  
0.31  
0.47  
0.19  
0.50  
0.46  
0.09  
0.063 (0.649)  
0.070 (0.351)  
0.168 (0.125)  
0.003 (1.000)  
­ 0.062 (0.273)  
­ 0.139 (0.514)  
­ 0.035 (1.000)  
46  
45  
BraAr  
b.  
CreSa  
0
0.753  
0.009 < 0.001  
0.046  
< 0.001 < 0.001  
< 0.001 < 0.001 < 0.001  
CreAr Ang  
Hol  
0.006  
0.025 < 0.001  
0.210  
0
Brn  
0.019  
Brf  
0.386  
0.0002 < 0.001  
BraAr  
0.001  
CreSa  
< 0.001  
0
0.00008  
0.518  
0
CreAr  
Ang  
Hol  
Brn  
0.004  
0.272  
0
0.05  
0.074  
0.234  
0
< 0.001  
< 0.001  
< 0.001  
0.007  
0
0.013 < 0.001  
0.003  
<0.001  
<0.001  
Brf  
0.008  
BraAr < 0.001 < 0.001 < 0.001 < 0.001 < 0.001 < 0.001  
Discussion  
The effect of CAPN1 polymorphisms has been  
extensively studied in several taurine and zebuine  
breeds. The CAPN1­316­C allele has been associated  
with higher meat tenderness in breeds such as Nellore,  
Brahman, Santa Gertrudis, Canchin, Brangus,  
Braunvieh, Angus and Hanwoo, and crossbreeds of  
Angus x Nellore, Rubia Gallega x Nellore, Angus x  
Hereford and British x Limousin (Barendse et al., 2008;  
Chung et al., 2014; Corva et al., 2007; Curi et al., 2010;  
Gill et al., 2009; Page et al., 2002; Page et al., 2004; White  
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132  
Genetic diversity of Calpain 1 gene in bovine breeds in Bolivia  
127  
et al., 2005). The results obtained in the present study  
show that while the frequency of CAPN1­316­C in  
CreBo as well as in CreAr is considerably high (> 20  
Finally, the major allele of CAPN1­530 SNP is  
CAPN1­530­G, with frequency values between 0.77 in  
CreBo and 0.94 in BraBo. This result also agrees with  
previous studies performed in several pure and  
composite breeds (Chung et al., 2014; Corva et al.,  
2007). Page et al. (2002), proposed that the CAPN1­530­  
G allele had a beneficial effect on meat tenderness as  
compared with CAPN1­530­A. Interestingly, the  
breeds studied so far, including those of the present  
study, showed higher frequencies of this allele.  
However, subsequent studies showed conflicting  
results regarding the effect of this SNP on meat  
tenderness.  
%
), the NelBo and BraBo breeds present a very low  
frequency of this variant (< 10 %). These data are in  
agreement with previous reports showing that taurine  
breeds generally present a higher frequency of this  
allele than zebu breeds (Barendse et al., 2008; Corva et  
al., 2007; Curi et al., 2010; Gill et al., 2009; López­Rojas  
et al., 2017; Page et al., 2002; Soria et al., 2010; White et  
al., 2005), while composite breeds often present  
intermediate frequencies. In this sense, the high  
frequency of the CAPN1­316­C allele in CreBo may be  
due to its taurine origin (Liron et al., 2006a,b ; Primo,  
1
992). The higher gene frequencies of favorable  
Genetic differences among breeds may be due to  
the presence of different alleles, to different genetic  
frequencies or to different haplotype combinations.  
Although CAPN1 polymorphisms have been  
extensively reported in several bovine breeds, most  
studies have analyzed only one or two of the CAPN1  
SNPs included in the present study, and only a few  
CAPN1 and CAST alleles in Bolivian Creole cattle  
reported in the present work agree with meat quality  
analysis performed in Creole breeds. These reports  
showed that Creole cattle and their crossbreed had  
similar Warner­Blatzer shear force values (3.5 to 5 kg)  
to those reported in European taurine breeds,  
including Angus (Garriz et al., 1993; Holgado et al.,  
works  
have  
reported  
LD  
among  
CAPN1  
2
021).  
polymorphisms (Castro et al., 2016; Chung et al., 2014;  
White et al., 2005). LD analysis of CAPN1­316¸  
CAPN1­530 and CAPN1­530 SNPs within CreBo,  
NelBo and BraBo breeds showed that six out of seven  
tests exhibited significant LD p­values (Table S2),  
excepting CAPN1­316 and CAPN1­530 pairwise  
comparison in NelBo. In agreement with the  
significant LD previously observed in the three  
genotyped SNP, a more detailed analysis of LD within  
the CAPN1 gene using the Bos 1 microarray data  
showed two LD blocks clearly defined in Angus,  
Argentine and Bolivian Creole cattle, and Brahman­  
Composite breeds (Figure 1). The first one comprised  
four SNPs spanning from 44.067 to 44.072Mb of BTA29  
and included CAPN1­316, while the second block  
comprised two SNPs and covered the region from  
44.085 to 44.087bp and included CAPN1­4751. None of  
these blocks included CAPN1­530; however, this  
genetic marker was located close to the upstream end  
of block 2. As shown in Figure 1, the level of  
recombination between two blocks, measured through  
multiallelic D' parameter, varied between 0.48 and  
0.64. It is noteworthy that the number and population  
frequency as well as connections from block 1 to the  
next varied among Angus, Argentine and Bolivian  
Creole cattle and Brahman­Composite breeds. Similar  
results were published by Chung et al. (2014), who  
reported an LD block between exon 14 and intron 17.  
This is relevant because certain CAPN1 haplotypes  
have been associated with meat tenderness (Chung et  
al., 2014; Lee et al., 2014; White et al., 2005). For  
example, Page et al. (2004), reported that CAPN1­316­  
C – CAPN1­530­G haplotype was associated with  
higher tenderness among the four possible classes,  
In the case of the CAPN1­4751 SNP, the C allele  
has been associated with higher meat tenderness in  
breeds such as Nellore, Brahman, Canchin, Brangus,  
Braunvieh, Angus, Hanwoo and crossbreeds between  
Angus x Nellore and Rubia Gallega x Nellore (Bonilla  
et al., 2010; Casas et al., 2006; Chung et al., 2014; Curi et  
al., 2009; Gill et al., 2009; Pinto et al., 2010; Soria et al.,  
2
010; White et al., 2005). As in the first SNP analyzed,  
the present results show that CreBo and CreAr have a  
significantly higher frequency of CAPN1­4751­C (> 75  
%
These results also agree with those reported in the  
literature showing that taurine breeds present higher  
CAPN1­4751­C allele frequency than zebu breeds  
) than NelBo (< 10 %) and BraBo (< 16 %) in Bolivia.  
(
Bonilla et al., 2010; Casas et al., 2006; Curi et al., 2009;  
Gill et al., 2009; Pinto et al., 2010; Pinto et al., 2011; Soria  
et al., 2010), while composite breeds generally present  
intermediate frequencies. Compared with previous  
studies, CreBo breeds, as well as CreAr, presented an  
exceptionally high CAPN1­4751­C allele frequency.  
Interestingly, Creole cattle had similar CAPN1­4751­C  
allele frequency than Iberian and African Taurine  
breeds (Rodero et al., 2013; Pelayo et al., 2016). The  
partial African origin of Creole cattle germoplasm is  
already known (Liron et al., 2006a,b). Thus, in the case  
of CAPN1­316, this could be a consequence of the  
historical origin of Creole cattle that defined the  
characteristics of Creole cattle meat (Garriz et al., 1993;  
Holgado et al., 2021; Liron et al., 2006a,b; Primo, 1992).  
ISSN­L 1022­1301. Archivos Latinoamericanos de Producción Animal. 2022. 30 (2): 121­132